ShareThis

The following data, average wages for American workers does not include income from stock options, bonuses or other cash benefits. It also isn't adjusted for inflation, which, as measured by the consumer price index, rose 22.3% over the period. That means workers whose wages rose less than the CPI saw no gains in spending power. 1999 estimates are based on partial data.

 

Occupation
1991
1999
Percent change
1991-99
Aircraft pilots 79,000 78,880
-1.3
Auto mechanics 23,720 30,560
28.8
Building service workers 16,400 19,720
20.2
Cashiers 12,880 14,600
13.4
Computer engineers 36,120 49,080
35.9
Computer programmers 35,480 51,820
46.1
Construction workers 23,240 29,200
25.6
Dentists 63,120 94,920
50.4
Economists 34,180 45,020
31.7
Electrical engineers 42,600 60,160
41.2
Entertainers & athletes 25,520 29,980
17.5
Firefighters 30,120 36,980
22.8
Food service workers 12,760 14,920
16.9
Hotel desk clerks 16,100 15,520
-3.6
Lawyers 52,780 72,820
38.0
Morticians 26,120 42,500
62.7
Pharmacists 36,460 54,900
50.6
Physicians 66,520 98,020
47.4
Plumbers 29,200 39,460
35.1
Police 30,640 37,540
22.5
Real-estate brokers 33,680 43,760
29.9
Registered nurses 27,400 36,020
31.5
Religious professionals 26,780 24,180
-9.7
Reporters 26,860 36,940
37.5
Salespeople 15,380 18,200
18.3
Secretaries 20,560 26,960
31.1
Securities & financial services/sales 31,480 79,820
153.6
Teachers 22,840 27,340
19.7
Telecom installers 29,220 43,340
48.3
Therapists 29,660 39,660
33.7
       

Sources: BLS, BEA, RFA, Dismal Sciences