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  1. Coal miner Lee Hipshire was photographed in 1976 emerging from a mine after a long day's work. Years after his father's death, his son found out the photo was used by Russian trolls to support Trump.
  2. Christians gathered Sunday to mark the the end of Holy Week and celebrate Easter. Pope Francis addressed a crowd of nearly 70,000 people at St. Peter's Square and denounced the violence in Sri Lanka.
  3. More than 200 people have been killed in coordinated bombings across Sri Lanka. NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro gets the latest on the ground in Colombo from journalist Lisa Fuller.
  4. This season's final competition, originally scheduled for mid-March, had to be bumped up by two weeks. "The river was already melting," the town's mayor explained.
  5. At least 130 people have been killed in coordinated bombings in Sri Lanka that targeted luxury hotels and churches, as people gathered for Easter services.
  6. With Iowa caucuses still nine months away, candidates in the huge field of Democrats are looking to stand out. One way: show up in voters' homes.
  7. Nearly 300 people were killed in blasts at three churches and three hotels. No one claimed responsibility, but the nation's defense minister says the attacks were the work of religious extremists.
  8. Protesters set fires in eastern Paris as they marched for the 23rd Saturday in a row. They say the efforts to restore the damaged Notre Dame cathedral are eclipsing their demands.
  9. Authorities say they arrested an 18- and 19-year-old under the U.K.'s controversial Terrorism Act and took them to the Musgrave Serious Crime Suite, a police station in Belfast.
  10. Few authors get to pick who will provide the exclusive first review of their work, and Mueller didn't either. That choice was made by the principal character in the story, the president himself.