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N.Y. Times news on Electric and Hybrid vehicles

chart outlining the cost benefits of electric cars and vehicles

 

  1. The assembly plant in Flint, Mich., has produced millions of vehicles and supported generations of workers. Now a strike has rendered it idle.
  2. U.A.W. regional leaders in Detroit voted unanimously on Sunday morning to authorize the strike, the union’s first such walkout since 2007.
  3. In 2019 in the U.S., sport utility vehicles and pickups are grabbing a record 70 percent of the market. Asian and European automakers see things differently.
  4. Arnstadt’s embrace of a giant new battery plant for electric cars illustrates Europe’s ambivalence toward Chinese investment: Jobs trump geopolitics.
  5. A small army of real people are building a special edition of the 2020 Acura TLX at American Honda’s Performance Manufacturing Center in Ohio.
  6. The executive pledged to return the stock-based compensation, which he blamed on an error, putting more scrutiny on the company’s compensation practices.
  7. The Coventry Transport Museum chronicles the heyday of the British auto industry, with a history lesson on world wars and a spirit to rebuild.
  8. Once the epitome of luxury, the high-end General Motors line is attempting another makeover to catch up with rivals that have overtaken it.
  9. The grandson of the designer of the Beetle, he rescued Volkswagen from near bankruptcy but was blamed for creating a company culture that bred scandal.
  10. Nearly three years after VW started its buyback program, it says it has 100,000 left to sell. Dealers say demand is surprisingly strong.
  11. The Japanese carmaker’s public accounting of its internal problems could provide a handy road map for lawyers seeking payback for investor losses.
  12. A judge ruled that a lawsuit filed by 33 women cannot proceed as a class-action suit. The women said that harassment was endemic at two Chicago plants.
  13. A million electric rickshaws sprang up out of nowhere and are now being used by 60 million people a day. The government and vehicle makers are struggling to catch up.
  14. The White House, blindsided by a pact between California and four automakers, appears to be losing ground in its effort to prevent any more for joining the agreement.
  15. The bidding for the Porsche Type 64, built by Ferdinand Porsche in 1939, was supposed to open at $13 million but instead started at $30 million.